Whitelisting

He  was  very  lonely  and  extremely  depressed  about  his  struggling  career.

JONATHAN   BRANDIS  :  1976  –  2003  

“When  you  talk  about  BLACKLISTING,  does  it  go  on?  Yes.  Is  it  understood?  No,  because  they  ( the  Political  Left  in  Hollywood )  don’t  make  the  connection  ( between  their  hypocritical  actions  and  the  oppressive  consequences  thereof ).

However,  I  would  make  this  distinction.  In  a  BLACKLIST,  you  didn’t  work  if  you  were  a  communist.  It  didn’t  matter  how  well  you  did.  You  were  not  going  to  work.

What  we  have  here  is  a  WHITELIST.  There  is  a  list  but  the  difference  is  that  you’re  not  really  accepted  in  ‘Polite  Company’  ( the  A-List  as  defined  by  the  leftwing  cultural  elites  of  Tinseltown ).  However,  if  you  are  necessary  and  useful  to  a  project,  you  can  be  used  and  that  can  be  done  without  reflecting  poorly  on  the  employer.

You  have  two  choices.  One  is  to  bury  your  ( conservative )  politics  and  simply  go  about  your  business.  The  other  is  to  be  open  about  what  you  really  are.  You  cannot  get  caught  between  two  seats or  stools.

For  me,  it  was  just  too  hard.  It’s  never  the  crime.  It’s  the  lie.  It’s  not  in  my  nature.     It  never  was.  That’s  what my  choice  was.

I  have  survived  and  succeeded  and  flourished  inspite  of  it.  But  I  know  the  price  I  paid  socially  and  I  know  the  price  I  paid  professionally.

( Lionel  Chetwynd ,  writer-director-producer  in  “AMC  Explores  What  It  Means  To  Be  A  Hollywood  Republican  In  Hollywood”  by  Kate  O’Hare,  zapzit.com:  September  14,  2004 )

Conservative  cuties  can  also  find  succor  at  the  home  of  Emmy-nominated  producer  Lionel  Chetwynd.  The  writer of  more  than  30  television  movies,  Chetwynd  acts  as  informal  counselor  to  young  actor  and  actresses  easing  themselves  out  of  the  Republican  closet.

‘Most  of  them  are  simply  looking  for  advice,’  he  says.  ‘What  will  this  really  do  to  me?  They  must  understand  that  there  is  a  price  to  be  paid.

His  advice  to  querulous  young  righties:  ‘Recognize  that  you’re  not  one  of  those  actors  who  can  throw  a fit.  Always  say  yes.  Always  be  cooperative.  Recognize  there  is  no  margin  for  error  for  people  like  us  in  this  community.‘ ”

( “Young  And  Republican  In  Hollywood”  by  Ruth  Shalit,  DETAILS  magazine :  September  2004,  p.  216 )

“In  1980,  Lionel  Chetwynd  was  an  accomplished  screenwriter  who  was  working  with  the  Ronald  Reagan  campaign  and  hosting  meetings  where  Reagan  boosters  talked  up  their  candidate  before  Hollywood  denizens.  After  a  session  featuring  supply-side  guru  Arthur  Laffer,  a  prominent  L. A.  liberal  named  Stanley  K.  Sheinbaum  chastized  the  attendees  for  flirting  with  Reaganism.

‘Sheinbaum  pointed  his  finger  and  said  ( a  virtual  threat ) :  You  are  consorting  with  people  who  ran  the  Hollywood  BLACKLIST.  I  know  who  you  are  and  I  know  where  you  work.‘  Chetwynd  recalls  ( the  menacing  act  of  intimidation ).  ‘It  was  chilling.  Noone  came  back.  A  lot  of   people  whispered,  I’m  with  you  but  don’t  tell  anyone.

After  Clinton  won  in  1992,  Chetwynd  was  willing  to  take  another  stab  at  corralling  Hollywood’s  conservatives.  ‘I  have  had  nightmares  about  the  Sheinbaum  episode,’  Chetwynd  says.  ‘But  I  felt  that  if  we  cannot  have  an  alternative  view  here,  its  bad  for  the  Republic.  We  create  the  popular  culture  here  and  there’s  no  political  debate  in  Hollywood?  That  cannot  be  healthy.’ ”

( “Looking  For  Mr.  Right”  by  David  Corn,  The  Nation :  April  5,  1999 )

“Nevertheless,  Lionel  Chetwynd’s  attachment  to  cherished  Republican  causes  sometimes  disqualifies  him  from  work.

There  was  once  a  television  network  executive  who  declined  to  hire  him  and  actually  said  to  other  people  at  a  staff  meeting:  ‘We  will  not  be  hiring  Lionel  Chetwynd  because  he  is  a  conservative  and  conservatives  cannot  write  caring  characters.’

‘This  kind  of  distressed  me,  especially  because  he  ( the  executive )  was  a  gay  man.  And  I  would  have  thought  that  he  should,  at  the  very  least,  have  enough  sensitivity  to  avoid  that  kind  of  prejudiced  stereotyping.’  Chetwynd  says.

Being  a  liberal  in  Hollywood  is  not  just  a  political  statement.  It’s  a  religion.‘ ”

( “Mr.  Right :  Lionel  Chetwynd,  Hollywood  Republican”  by  Michael  Posner,                          The  Globe  and  Mail :  January  25,  2003 )

“So  how  do  conservatives  survive?  They  survive  by  being  better.  That’s  to  say            it’s  do-able.  Popular  culture  is  always  going  to  be  a  grab  bag.  My  complaint  has  been  that  Hollywood  is  like  a  grab  bag  which  has  only  a  single  kind  of  Jolly  Rancher  hard  candy.  There  hasn’t  been  enough  choice.

I  am  worried  that  this  situation  will  infuriate  my  colleagues  on  the  right  and  they  will  never  embrace  Hollywood.  They’ll  always  see  it  as  a  punching  bag  rather  than  look  upon  it  as  an  important  and  vital  industry.  I  mean,  it’s  the  jewel  in  our  national  patrimony.            Films  tells  us  who  we  are.  They  are  how  we  tell  the  world  what  we  stand  for.  It’s  why  people  want  to  come  here.  And  we  must  never,  never  desert  this  battlefield.

My  view  has  always  been:  don’t  apologize  for  who  you  are.  You  cannot  tell me  that  being  a  conservative  means  you  can’t  write  a  sitcom  or  a  movie.  That’s  how                    we  make  our  way:  by  outperforming  the  other  side,  by  being  better.  There’s  a  great  vineyard  here  from  which  to  harvest  and  make  the  wine  for  our  side.  And  we  represent  an  increasingly  large  part  of  the  market,  too.  I  think  what  we  need  to  do  is            ply  our  craft  and  not  be  afraid  of  who  we  are.

( “A  Conversation  With  Lionel  Chetwynd”  interviewed  by  Govindini  Murty,  www.libertyfilmfestival.com :  June  23,  2005 )

Are  conservatives  in  Hollywood  scared  to  death  of  identifying  themselves  publicly  and  speaking  out?

Yes,  because  they  know  that  they  will  be  punished  if  they  do.

However,  the  degree  of  punishment  ultimately  depends  upon  how  far  up  their  positions  are  within  the  industry’s  pecking  order  and  hierarchy.

If  they  are  useful  enough  and  can  do  something  valuable  for  the  corporate  structure  or  system  of  the  liberal  elites,  they  may  survive.

But  if  not,  then  they  will be  definitely  shunned  and  may  even  be  fired.”

( Playwright  David  Mamet talking  about  his  new  book  “The  Secret  Knowledge”  during  an  interview  with  Sean  Hannity  on  the  FOXNews  channel :  July  8,  2011 )

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